× Home About us Contact Us Contributor Guidelines – All Perfect Stories Register Submit Your Stories
learning styles
By JENHENSEY 240 views
PERSONAL

Knowing How Your Child Learns Best

Have you observed your child finding it difficult to cope in school? Do they find it hard to finish their assignments on time or keep up in subjects like physics or mathematics?

As a parent, you may feel frustrated and helpless. After all, you want your child to succeed and do well in school.

One reason why your child may be struggling is that they have a different learning style than the teaching methods used in school. By knowing their learning style, you can help them by having them attend one-on-one Physics Tuition or getting different resources to help them learn at home.

What is a learning style?

There are plenty of different models out there, but in general, a learning style is how each individual learns best.

Some people learn better by listening to audio recordings, others by seeing visuals or mind maps. And some people prefer a more hands-on approach.

We all have different preferences when it comes to learning. And while we can learn through different methods, we usually have a dominant learning style.

The 4 Different Learning Styles: The VARK Model

In this article, we’ll focus on the VARK model of learning styles. It was developed by Neil Fleming in the 1980s and is still widely used today. VARK stands for:

  • Visual (learning through seeing)
  • Aural (learning through hearing)
  • Read/write (learning through reading and writing)
  • Kinesthetic (learning through touching and doing)

According to the VARK model, everyone has a preferred learning style. However, we use all four modes of learning to some extent. Let’s go in-depth on each of the different learning styles.

Visual learners

Visual learners are those who learn best by seeing. They prefer visual aids like pictures, diagrams, and mind maps. A visual learner would rather watch a video or presentation than read an article.

If your child is a visual learner, they may:

  • Doodle or take notes in different colors
  • Use highlighters when reading
  • Organize their thoughts using mind maps or post-it notes
  • Remember things by seeing them
  • Prefer to learn in a well-lit room

Aural learners

Aural learners are those who learn best by hearing. They prefer listening to audio recordings or lectures. Unlike visual learners, aural learners don’t need much in the way of visuals. In fact, too many visuals can be overwhelming for them.

If your child is an aural learner, they may:

  • Prefer to learn by listening to audio recordings or podcasts
  • Talk to themselves when trying to remember something
  • Like music playing
  • Grasp concepts better when they explain them out loud

If your child is an aural learner, try getting them audio recordings of their physics lessons. That way, they can listen to them as many times as they need to and learn at their own pace.

Read/write learners

As the name suggests, read/write learners learn best by reading and writing. They prefer printed materials like books and articles. This learning style is often used in classrooms, which is why many read/write learners do well in school.

If your child is a read/write learner, they may:

  • Prefer to learn by reading texts or taking notes
  • Like learning in a quiet environment
  • Remember things by writing them down
  • Do well in tests that require rote memorization
  • Get overwhelmed by too many visuals

If your child is a read/write learner, try getting them different resources like textbooks or workbooks to help them learn at home.

Kinesthetic learners

Among the different learning styles, kinesthetic learners are the most hands-on. They learn best by touching and doing. Kinesthetic learners often struggle in traditional classrooms because they need to move around to learn.

If your child is a kinesthetic learner, they may:

  • Prefer to learn through hands-on activities
  • Get fidgety when sitting for too long
  • Remember things by moving their bodies
  • Do better in lab experiments than in lectures
  • Have trouble paying attention to audio recordings

How can you apply the VARK learning styles model to help your child?

Say your child is struggling in a particular subject. One way to help them is to find out their learning style and then look for resources that cater to that learning style.

For example, if your child is a visual learner, you can get them color-coded notebooks or different charts and diagrams. If your child is an aural learner, you can get them audio recordings of their lessons.

If your child is a read/write learner, you can get them different textbooks or workbooks. And if your child is a kinesthetic learner, you can get them different hands-on materials.

As for enrolling them in O-level physics tuition to prepare them for exams, you can also look for a tutor whose teaching style complements your child’s learning style.

For example, if your child is a visual learner, you can look for a tutor who uses different colors and diagrams in their teaching. If your child is an aural learner, you can look for a tutor who is patient and can explain things clearly.

If your child is a read/write learner, you can look for a tutor who is organized and can provide different resources. And if your child is a kinesthetic learner, you can look for a tutor who is flexible and willing to try different methods.

Other Learning styles

While the mentioned four learning styles are the most popular, it should be noted that there are different ways of learning. Some people may prefer a more solitary and introspective approach while others learn best in a group setting.

There is no single correct way to learn and different methods work for different people. The most important thing is to find what works best for your child and to help them learn in a way that is conducive to their needs. Some other learning styles include:

Solitary learners:

These learners prefer to learn on their own and at their own pace. They may be more introverted and dislike working in groups. One-on-one tutoring may work best for these learners. 

Social learners:

Contrary to solitary learners, social learners prefer to learn in groups. They are often extroverted and may get antsy when learning on their own. Social learning can take different forms like group discussion or role-playing.

Social learners are the ones who do best preparing for exams with other people. C

Logical learners:

These learners like to approach learning from a more logical standpoint. They prefer systems and patterns and may find abstract concepts more difficult to grasp. For these learners, it may be helpful to find a tutor who can explain things in a more step-by-step manner.

Linguistic learners

As you may have guessed, linguistic learners prefer to learn through language. This can include reading, writing, and talking. These learners often excel in English and other language-based subjects.

Interpersonal learners:

Like social learners, interpersonal learners also prefer to learn in groups. However, interpersonal learners are more interested in learning about people than the actual material. These learners may do well in subjects like history and psychology.

Conclusion

Children have different learning styles and it is important to find a teaching method that works best for them. One way to do this is by using the VARK learning style model. This model suggests that there are four different learning styles: visual, aural, read/write, and kinesthetic.

But this isn’t the only model out there and different children may prefer different methods of learning. The most important thing is to experiment and find what works best for your child. Different resources and different teaching styles can make all the difference in a child’s education.

jenhensey
Author
JENHENSEY

Call me Jen Hensey, a writer and blogger of LifeStyleConvo & UrbanHouses, who worked as a full-time content creator. A writer by day and reader by night.